How to achieve an effective EVP

Producing and delivering an effective Employee Value Proposition

An Employee Value Proposition (EVP) is the agreement between the employer outlining the benefits and key features for working in the organisation and the performance and contributions expected of the employee.

EVP, Employee value proposition, Towers Watson, 10 key practices, employee survey data, total rewards strategy

An effective EVP enables organisations to stand out from its competitors, attract and retain talent and strengthen employer brand.  By integrating an

EVP that aligns the employer brand strategy with the internal and external communications plan, companies are fast recognising the cascading effect it can have.  From leadership communication to regular training and development; an open culture to attractive benefits; successful EVP’s are fast becoming key fundamentals to a company’s success.

According to Towers Watson’s latest Change and Communication Global ROI Research study:

Organisations who use their employee value proposition most effectively are five times more likely to report highly engaged employees. They are twice as likely to report achieving financial performance significantly above their peers. Organisations recorded higher performance when compared to companies that use their EVP less effectively.

“The employee value proposition is one of the best tools available for companies to engage employees, as well as attract and retain top talent,” says Richard Veal, head of Towers Watson’s Reward, Talent and Communication consulting UK practice. “Unfortunately, to many organisations, the EVP remains a hidden gem that is unshaped, overlooked or not utilised to its fullest extent. Our latest research provides important insights into what makes the best companies – those with highly effective EVPs – different.”

Making your EVP stand out from the crowd

But how can you achieve an effective employee value proposition and what are the key steps to overall success?  Here are our 4 steps for creating and implementing a company-changing EVP:

1. Collaboration

Gather a team which will enrich the EVP process and encapsulate the essence of the company as well as meeting the overall objectives.  A cross-functional team which includes marketing, communication, HR, team leaders and line managers can provide a more successful outcome.  By collaborating with different departments across a wide age range, this can shape an EVP which is more purpose-driven, achievable and sustainable.

2. Objectives

Once you have organised a unified team, ascertain the key objectives of the EVP. Define who you are as a company (vision and ethos), the services you deliver and the staff you employ. Consider what you need to succeed internally and externally and the competitive market you operate in. This will help define your overall employer brand, your brand positioning and what you need to evolve and expand in your industry.

3. Internal implementation

Your employees are your biggest ambassadors. Therefore, it is imperative that you incorporate your EVP into company inductions, reward and recognition schemes, communications and business strategies. This shows your employees that the ethos of the EVP is readily integrated throughout the company and not a pipedream.

4. Communication

Once you have created your EVP use creative channels to communicate it to the people you are trying to attract. Adapt company websites, external advertising and interview processes; this will give prospective talents an opportunity to determine if they would make a good fit for your business. Consistently communicating through branding, PR, social and marketing can help audiences develop a positive perception about the company. As a result it will add value, attract and retain talents and position your company as ‘an employer of choice’.

With an effective EVP you will have candidates fighting to work for you and employees fighting to stay with you!

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At ClearVoice™, we are experts in delivering employee communication and engagement solutions. We inspire, motivate and transform your workforce to increase your company’s productivity and profits. For more information or help with creating and delivering a strategically focused EVP, call or email us today and let us show you how engagement can boost your organisation.

Defining organisational integrity

Organisational Integrity: we hear it, we see it but do we follow it?

Organisational integrity is and should be the foundation of any working environment.  Building trust and incentivising staff to go ‘above and beyond’ is encouraged through honesty and transparency filtered through great leaders.

As a collective interpretation of individual integrity; organisational integrity guides core values, aspirations and patterns of thought and conduct among staff.  It creates an environment that encourages trust, promotes accountability and consequently, better engagement.

By integrating more robust standards, successful organisational integrity creates an environment everyone wants to be a part of and fully supports, comprehends and understands any structural, transformational changes.

The core values

But what are the core values to base a successful organisational integrity strategy on? And how can you avoid disruption to the integration and implementation of the strategy including performance management, role conflicts and ethical climates?

organisational integrity, core values, values, company culture, culture, employee engagement, accountability, responsibility

Fundamentally, the key value is trust!  Creating an organisational integrity strategy must encourage trust from the team; promote honest and transparent communication and create peer and senior led decisions based on the motto ‘do what you say you will do, truthfully and consistently with your team’.  Taking into consideration these core values will help achieve a more sustainable and operable strategy. We have put together our top core values tips to help create a culture of trust and organisational integrity based on three simple points.

Top three core values tips:

Smarter decisions: Decision-making can be an easy task.  But if you are over-committing or under-valuing expectations, respect for leaders and managers soon becomes waned and tiresome.  As a result, staff motivation starts to drop.  Making more meaningful and attainable decisions can contribute to a better engaged and trusted workforce.

Honest accountability: Composing and delivering decisions can naturally become hierarchical if not communicated effectively or coherently with the team.  Integrating decision making that responds to crisis situations or provides honest account of current problems can have a cascading effect on the mentality of the team.  Avoiding happy illusions will encourage staff to respond in the same transparent manner; it enables them to see the reality of their situation and taking responsibility for delivering results.

Open environment: Creating a more open and receptive culture within any organisation allows staff to feel supported; it encourages them to speak up as and when a situation may arise.  This leads to greater accountability and responsibility to improve, excel and promote a more effective and motivated working environment.

As employee engagement experts, Engage for Success state: ‘Trust is fundamental to high performance in a team, and high engagement in an organisation. Organisational integrity builds trust’.

Have your say

Tweet us @ClearVoiceComms

 At ClearVoice™, we are experts in delivering employee communication and engagement solutions. We inspire, motivate and transform your workforce to increase your company’s productivity and profits. For more information or help with developing an organisational integrity strategy, call or email us today and let us show you how engagement can boost your organisation.

Guest blog: Culture and values – what’s it worth?

The true cost of culture and values

The vast majority of people turn up for work wanting to do a great job. But, unfortunately, many organisations manage to rapidly prevent them achieving that goal. Not intentionally of course; but unless you have a well planned on-boarding process accompanied by a welcoming culture, you are likely to fall at the first hurdle as the glow of the new job becomes tarnished by the reality of bureaucracy, process, and daily tedium. This is when a good culture supported by meaningful values can make all the difference.

It will have cost your organisation around £30,000 to find and replace that employee and in turn he or she has spent a great deal in time, energy, and probably anxiety, changing jobs or starting their first one. High expectations on both sides. So it’s not hard to see that if that family style supportive culture promised at the interviews along with the welcome talks from those important people under-deliver, there will fast be disappointment. And that can cost you dearly.

Time for a few Stats

According to the Deloitte 2017 Global Human Capital Trends Survey:

  • Organisational culture, engagement, and employee brand proposition remain top priorities in 2017; employee experience ranks as a major trend again this year.
  • Nearly 80 percent of executives rated employee experience very important (42 percent) or important (38 percent), but only 22 percent reported that their compa­nies were excellent at building a differentiated employee experience.
  • Fifty-nine percent of survey respondents reported they were not ready or only somewhat ready to address the employee experience challenge.

simply irresistible organisation model, deloitte university press

 

It’s not all that surprising that the majority of employers are poor at creating a great employee experience. Only the most enlightened business leaders can see the ROI on great culture supported by genuine values.  Most are wrapped up in issues where the payback is more tangible, easier to see and measure.

It’s time to wake up and smell the coffee

Trends show that this issue is not going away but rather becoming more important. For example, new graduates entering the workplace are no longer obsessed with just the salary and benefits package. They want to work somewhere they can share in values they believe in and a culture that supports them. And of course, if your employer’s culture is not something special, irreplaceable and distinctive, there is much less to stop you going to work somewhere else.

Worst of all is having a set of values on the website and on the walls in your meeting rooms which are largely unknown by the employees (can you recite your Company Values?), and not put into practice by management. Better to have none than to openly demonstrate ignorance or hypocrisy.

And it’s easier than ever today to find out what it’s really like working somewhere. Tools such as Glassdoor and Facebook make it very easy to see reality as opposed to what they want you to see on the website!

Every organisation should strive to be unique, even if the products and services are scarcely differentiated from competitors. In fact in this case it’s even more important. Don’t forget that your culture will shine through to customers, prospective customers, prospective employees, suppliers and everyone you deal with. It’s what makes you different. Culture often emanates from the original founder, even if they are no longer around. It’s that hard-to-describe essence that makes your place the place it is. By creating a timeless set of Values, you can capture that essence and use it make your organisation special, different and great.

Expensive if you get it wrong, valuable if you get it right

Even if you find it hard to see the tangible benefits, the costs associated with getting it wrong (poor culture, no values or redundant values) are likely to be immense:

  • Higher staff turnover @ £30,000 per head
  • Less motivated employees, less likely to go the extra mile
  • Unsustainable customer satisfaction – if your employees are not engaged, your customers will feel this in their interactions and will be less loyal to you. Your business could die.

Try putting a price on each of these for your organisation.

Every organisation has a culture whether you like it or not. Might as well use it positively, supported by a tangible set of values, to help engage employees and customers in a sustainable way.

At amp Performance Limited, we help both public and private organisations by developing performance improvement solutions through Motivation and Incentives. We help answer people and business questions. We do this by providing services across Communication, Education, Measurement and Reward. Visit us at www.ampperformance.co.uk

Have your say and tweet us @ClearVoiceComms

Many thanks to Adam Sidbury, Director, at ampPerformance for his time and insight into the true cost of organisational culture and values. At ClearVoice™, we are experts in delivering employee communications and engagement solutions. We inspire, motivate and transform your workforce to increase your company’s productivity and profits. For more information on developing a well-planned on-boarding process and welcoming culture, call or email us today and let us show you how engagement can boost your organisation.